Digital Nomad on the woods yo

Author’s Note: This post is a sequel to last week’s Lessons from Remote Work Job Interviews around the world. – Pt 1. If you haven’t read that one, I highly suggest starting there.

Last week we talked about the first three lesson’s I got from my 4 month remote work interviewing process. We mainly learned that:

  • There will always be someone better, but that doesn’t have to stop us.
  • Saying “I don’t know” can be surprisingly powerful.
  • Reinforcing your fundamentals can lead you to discover new strengths.

Now, this week, we’re going to be discussing the final three lessons I got from this journey, starting now:

Continue Reading "Lessons from Remote Work Job Interviews around the World. – Pt 2"
Digital Nomad Life

I’ve spent the past 4 months of my life with a single focus: Getting a Remote Job. This was a process that led me into a journey of self-discovery, learning and personal growth. Here are some of the lessons I learned from Remote Work Job Interviews around the World.

Now, don’t get me wrong, I didn’t just spend 4 months throwing resumes out there and hoping for the best. That wouldn’t have been enough. These were three of the most hard-working months of my entire life: I’m talking 16 hour days of work and study.

And while I know that it may sound excessive for some people, to me it only made sense. I knew I wanted to change Jobs, and I knew I wasn’t about to settle down for more of the same. I didn’t want another 9 to 5, different office, similar commute.

No, my friends. To me, getting a remote job meant obtaining freedom. Freedom to be wherever I wanted to be, and to visit my friends and family more often. 

But, as some of you may already know, remote work isn’t an easy perk to come by. And it’s not that hard to understand why: you’re competing against the whole world for a job like this. This also meant that remote work job interviews were going to be a little more competitive than usual.

So I had to make my mind, was I willing to fight for the kind of life I wanted? And not only was the answer yes, but by now I can also say: It worked.

But this process didn’t come without it’s fair share of challenges. It wasn’t easy. And yet I would be lying if I were to say I didn’t learn anything from it.

I gained more than just the job I wanted from this experience – I gained valuable lessons that will forever change the way I see life. And these are the ones I want to talk about today.

Continue Reading "Lessons from Remote Work Job Interviews around the World. – Pt 1"
Joy

There comes a point in everybody’s path in which we must decide what we’re going to be doing for the rest of our lives. And, not only must we choose while not being fully mature, we must also be able to [somehow] guess the future viability of our choice. Five years down the line. I’m speaking, of course, about how to choose a fulfilling career.

The idea of this article first came to me while watching the soon-to-be-classic Three Idiots. A movie which, needless to say, is a must watch for anyone. Period. But, I guess, if you’re going through college (specially engineering), then the movie’s going to resonate with you a lot more.

Most of the drama in Three Idiots revolves around the feelings that drive the heroes in their career choices. It also deals with the pressure that comes from basing such choices on the wrong reasons.

While it is a little more complex than this, the three main viewports that the movie provides for picking a career are:

  • Pressure from others.
  • Fear of embracing your true calling.
  • And (if you’re lucky) true passion towards the craft.

And these points are the reason that got me hooked on this movie, in the first place.

Each one of these world views represents one of the main characters: Raju, Farham and Rancho respectively. But they also represent points of view that I held at different points in my life. And I doubt I’m the only one.

During this article, we will be having a look at all three reasons in order. Mostly because I feel that the first two precede the last one in most people’s journey for self understanding.

That being said though, let’s get started.

Continue Reading "How to choose a fulfilling career."
Should developers know design?

People (friends, colleagues, relatives, etc.) that know I am in the web business often approach me with a similar variant of the following:

“Hey Orlando, I’m doing X and I want a website for it, what do you think?”

And I always struggle a lot with this question. For one, I am a web professional and of course I want people building websites. But second, and perhaps more important: I am a web professional and I know not everyone needs a website. So this is an answer (and a series) that’s very controversial for me to write.

There a many different kind of reasons for which someone could want a website but, for the sake of simplicity, I’m going to divide these people into two groups: Business owners and Content creators.

Of course, these two groups usually end up overlapping with each other: business owners will probably benefit from creating content, and content creators will probably end up wanting to monetize their content. But as a starting point, I would say most websites probably get created for one of these two reasons.

For the sake of simplicity, I will be using the word “business” to reference both of these groups in this first section. But if you just so happen to belong to either of them, and are interested in getting yourself a new website, then this article is for you:

Continue Reading "Do you really need a website?"

Developer advice from a seasoned professional

Author’s note: I originally intended for this to be a single post containing some of the lessons I had gathered over the years of doing website development and design. Alas, it proved to be a little bit too long (spanning over 3000 words and 15 pages), so I decided to break it up a little. 

It is strongly recommended that you read part 1 of these series before moving forward onto the next, if only so I may let you know of the situation that inspired me to write these pieces of advice here for everyone to see them.

But, now that we’ve cleared that out, these are the last 6 pieces of advice I would like to share with you all:

Continue Reading "10 things new developers should know – Part 2"
Teaching developers javascript taught me things

I know what the title says, but I’d like to instead start by saying: I didn’t always enjoy teaching things or helping others understand different topics. As a matter of fact, it kind of [extremely] annoyed me to find people who didn’t seem to get a grasp on the things that I did at the same speed that it had taken me to learn them.

I was a very different (definitely more selfish) person than I am today. But I am glad that I didn’t stay being that way, because then I would have missed out on what has to this day been one of the most satisfying experiences of my life: Sharing my knowledge with other people.

Teaching is the reason that I even started writing this blog in the first place.

But what I find the most interesting is not what I was able to teach others. But what teaching others how to do different things has taught me.

And that is what I’m here to talk to you about today.

Continue Reading "How teaching javascript made me a better developer."

My friend Red had a problem with his code.

He was working on integrating a popover onto an application that used a home-brewed variant of Redux Form. This version came with a few extra features to [attempt to] make itself easier to use and reduce development time.

I’ll try to describe the problem in the easiest way possible:

  1. The popover was to be summoned by clicking a button inside the form.
  2. Upon clicking the button, the popover indeed showed up (so good so far.)
  3. The submit event for the form was triggered at the same time.

As you may imagine, this was less than desirable: You’d have an extra AJAX call without the necessary parameters, validation would trigger, children would cry, etc.

By the time I found him, he was proposing to catch the source of the event and use it to filter which buttons were allowed to initiate it. He also tried to scout the entire source code for Redux Form and the plugin built on top of it.

I suggested he change his trigger from a button to an anchor. The code was working 2 minutes later.

Continue Reading "Can it really be that easy? Well yes, yes it can be."

Edit: I felt like the original article was a little too long, and wanted to break it up and make it a little bit easier to take in, you can find part II of the series here.

A friend of mine is leaving the company this week. And among all the feelings that such an event could have sprung inside me; I really found myself wishing there was some kind of wisdom that I could bestow upon him.

Why? Well, to explain that I need to tell you a little bit about him.

You see, when I first met him he was a rookie in many different ways (this being his first job as a developer), and watching him grow into a full-fledged developer has been one of the most satisfying experiences of my career so far.

Working with him taught me a lot too because, before, I had always been the newbie at every office I was at. But now there was somebody younger and less experienced than me, who before I noticed began taking in a lot of my own technique and adding it to his own.

That experience opened my eyes to a lot of the things I had missed from my own development a few years back. And this time I was able to experience them, not through the eyes of a hot-headed kid trying desperately to become good at what I was doing (Thank you for your patience Josh.) But as a seasoned developer watching a rookie slowly come into his own.

So now that I close into the end of an era, I’d like to share with you a few of the things I learned from it. Plus a few others I wish I one day have the time to teach my friend.

Without further delay, here’s my advice to new developers:

Continue Reading "10 things new developers should know – Part 1"