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Orlando Paredes Hamsho

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HTML is old, reliable and does not cost your users half a minute to download. Making it essentially that thing you write when the client doesn’t pay you enough to actually use React. And while it’s not very fun or exciting, it is in fact a thing that you can do for money. So as the world’s best HTML Programmer it is my duty, no, my MISSION; to teach you How to HTML.


Note: This is a parody, please do not try to actually learn how to html from it. If you’re looking for a real tutorial. Codecademy’s one is pretty nice. Also the one on FreeCodeCamp.


Now there are only three things you’ll need when it comes to HTML:

  • Knowing how to use a computer.
  • Having the stuff you’re going to be copying and pasting.
  • And familiarizing yourself with the tags you’re going to be (ab)using.

Now, I trust you can take care of the first thing, so let’s get started with the second one:

I’ve avoided speaking of topics like this. On one hand: I don’t believe I have anything to add that hasn’t been said by 20 self-improvement authors already. On the other hand: I’m also not a fan of expressing my own personal story on the internet too much. But in the end “Never give up” has pretty much been my war cry for the last 6 years, so I decided I’d share some of that with you. To start the new year right. I’m going to start by saying that I don’t know you. For all I know, your life has seen much more hardship than mine, and you’ve accomplished more than me. Perhaps what I’ll say to you will seem simple whining. But, no matter how successful you are, I’m willing to bet that you’re going through something. And I’m here to tell you it’s going to be okay. On…

No fancy intro this time. It’s the end of the year and we all know what that means. Here’s some ideas on a coders new years resolutions for 2019: Join the #301DaysOfCode Movement or the #100DaysOfCode Movement I’m adding both of these at the start, since I realize committing to something for 301 days may seem a little daunting at first. There is, however, no reason to not start out with both of them at once, since they have pretty much the same rule set: Code a minimum of an hour every day for the next 100/301 days. Tweet your progress every day with the #100DaysOfCode and/or #301DaysOfCode hashtag and the day number. Here’s an example on how to do both from my friend Charlie on Twitter: https://twitter.com/carlosermota/status/1075229858022809600 The movements themselves represent one of the greatest opportunities ever afforded to junior and upcoming developers. This is because you get to…

I made these some tweets as well in my account @orliph. But I also decided to leave the whole thing posted here in case someone was interested. This is not meant to be offensive. I’m just poking a little bit of fun at the things our Scrum team can make us go through sometimes. So without further ado, here’s the Twelve Days of Coding Christmas: The Twelve Days Of Coding Christmas On day One of Coding Christmas my Scrum Team sent to me: A Whole Day Spent Debugging On day Two of Coding Christmas my Scrum Team sent to me: 2 Linting Errors and a Whole Day Spent Debugging On day Three of Coding Christmas my Scrum Team sent to me: 3 Change Requests 2 Linting Errors and a Whole Day Spent Debugging On day Four of Coding Christmas my Scrum team sent to me: 4 Freshers Learning 3 Change Requests…

So you finally got that job you wanted. Sure, it took some time and effort, but you managed to score a well paid position that matches all your needs. It has good career advancement plan, great benefits and to top it all off: Work from Home days. And you could not be more excited to start cashing them in. Maybe you’re on a fully remote team, managing your own business or enjoying those flexible Fridays everyone was talking about. Whatever the reason may be, you get to spend a day at home in your PJ’s drinking soda with the TV as background music. Or maybe you even decide to go out and take your work to the park, or the local Starbucks. Life is good and you start to fantasize about trips to the Caribbean, and taking pictures of your laptop with an orange drink. Then all of a sudden phone…

A conversation with a coworker had me thinking about the role of a web developer in product development. And I thought I would share my thoughts on the invisible nature of our craft. I was having a conversation with one of the guys at work regarding the architecture of a particular service. And while I don’t really intend to talk about the specifics of that service, I did want to talk about something he shared with me. I’ll put it in my own words: My work is at it’s best when it’s invisible. And, I have to admit, the thought actually resonated with me, it got me thinking about some of my own best work. And most of all, it got me thinking about the role of web developers in the creation of a product. Which is what we’re here to talk about today. Let’s talk about web applications. Before…

It’s now been about 4 months since I started my new life as a remote worker. To be quite honest, it’s been pretty great: traveling, no commute, making my own hours, etc. And yet, at the same time, I’ve been able to experience some of the realities of this way of life. So in today’s post I thought I would address some of the Myths (and truths) about remote work. Before we get started, however, I’d just like to say that I’ll be tackling these myths from the point of view of a remote worker. This whole conversation will be about how remote work affects you personally, rather than how it affects a company. With that being said, let’s dive right in. Is Remote Work Lonely? Myth: Working remotely means you’ll have a lot less company. Truth: Working remotely means your company is going to be different. This particular aspect…

By now it’s been about a month since the last post that I released on this blog. And, if I may be allowed to be totally honest, that’s too darn long.

It’s been a month packed with experiences adjusting to a new life in a new place. A month getting back in touch with old acquaintances. And a month that allowed me to finally celebrate fulfilling the goals I set out for me this year.

Except the Corgi. But we’ll get to him later.

Yet, such a lengthy celebration kept me from writing. Which is not amazing, because writing is one of the things I enjoy the most in this day and age.

However, taking a month off gave me some interesting life perspective. Which I’m compiling into next week’s post called ‘Remote Life – Work Balance’.

And it also got me to think about the reasons for which I write this blog. Which I’m going to be sharing today. It’s a little bit personal so, if that’s not really your thing, you’ve been warned.

But if you’re interested, let’s talk about it:

In this article we’re going to go over a Front End Developer’s first impressions of the Python programming language. I’ll try to keep things as objective as possible, but do keep in mind that it’ll be permeated by my own opinions. That being said, if you’re shopping for a new language to learn next, perhaps I can be of some assistance. It’s been a crazy couple of months, and I’ve barely had any time to breathe. Part of the reason for that is because I finally moved back to my hometown of Merida Yucatán. Something which I’m extremely thankful for. But that also took a lot of my everyday time. The other part is because I took it upon myself to become a Full Stack Developer at my new job. And that (in my case) meant learning Python. Which proved to have to be a little bit of a challenge.…

Last week we went over the main principles of MobX, as well as why mixing it with React is an amazing idea. That covers all of the basics that we need and sets common grounds of understanding. Which means we can now focus on building our first application using the two of them. And that’s what we’ll be doing in this MobX + React Tutorial. Our first MobX + React Application. We’re going to be building an App called a List Detail View. The App will render out a list of one line “summary” components for larger pieces of data. Additionally, clicking one of them will render a second component containing more detailed information. In this way you click on a list element to view its details. List Detail View. Simple enough right? See the Pen #100DaysOfCode: (React + MobX) List Detail View by Orlando Paredes Hamsho (@orliph) on CodePen.…